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Census 2020

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  • United States Census 2020 logo

Why is the 2020 Census important for Martin County?

Once a decade, Americans come together to participate in the U.S. Census and the data generated by the census is used to shape our future. Martin County relies upon state and federal funding, which is allocated based on census data, for many projects and initiatives in our community.

In order to be accurately represented, it is important that every Martin County resident be counted. It is estimated it costs local government $1,600 for every person missed. Martin County’s response rate in the 2010 Census was 78%.

For our community, that means a loss of over $51 MILLION each year that could have been used for vital programs and essential services. Over the 10 year period, that equates to approximately $512 million dollars!

Help us make sure Martin County is accurately represented in the upcoming decennial count. It benefits us all!
 

The Census is more than just a head count!

It’s a community snapshot.

The information collected will determine how state and federal dollars are distributed, how congressional seats are apportioned, where businesses choose to build factories, offices and stores.

Our local government officials use the census data to ensure public safety, plan new schools, hospitals, homes and improve neighborhoods. To do all that properly, it is essential that everyone in Martin County is counted. It benefits us all! 

Census Day is April 1, 2020. 

It’s about representation.

Every 10 years, the results of the census are used to reapportion the House of Representatives, determining how many seats each state gets. If Martin County residents aren’t accurately counted, our area may not receive the fair representation it deserves.

 

It’s about $675 billion.

The distribution of more than $675 billion in federal funds, grants and support to states, counties and communities are based on census data. That money is spent on schools, hospitals, roads, utilities and other vital programs. Information from the census is used to determine how to allocate more than $675 billion, much of it for programs that serve lower-income families, including Medicare, Head Start, reduced-price school lunch programs, temporary assistance for needy families and Pell grants. 

 

It’s in the Constitution.

The U.S. Constitution requires that everyone in the country be counted every ten years. Completing the census is mandatory: it’s a way to participate in our democracy and say, “I count!” Martin County residents should be proud to perform this civic duty and be part of this critical process. 

It’s confidential, safe and secure.

It’s against the law for the Census Bureau to publicly release your responses in any way that could identify your or your household. By law, your responses cannot be used against you and can only be used to produce statistics. Under Title 13 of the U.S. Code, the Census Bureau cannot release any identifiable information about individuals, households or businesses, even to law enforcement agencies. 

 

It’s about redistricting.

After each census, state officials use the results to redraw the boundaries of congressional and state legislative districts, accounting for population shifts.

Your response matters!

You can help ensure everyone in Martin County is counted by filling in the 2020 Census form. It will be a short set of questions about the number of people living in your household, their ages, race, ethnicity, and income. Every household will have the option of responding online, by mail or by phone.

Important dates:

  • March 12-20: Households will begin receiving official Census Bureau mail with detailed information on how to respond to the 2020 Census online, by phone, or by mail.
     
  • April 1: Census Day is observed nationwide. By this date, every home will receive an invitation to participate in the 2020 Census. Once the invitation arrives, you should respond for your home in one of three ways: online, by phone, or by mail. When you respond to the census, you'll tell the Census Bureau where you live as of April 1, 2020.
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